Sun CEO tells employees to ‘start with a clean slate’ at Oracle

News 25 Jan, 2010

Jonathan Schwartz has praised his staff at Sun Microsystems and told them to look to the future with Oracle, not back at ‘how we used to do things.’

A leaked memo from the chief executive (CEO) of Sun Microsystems has encouraged Sun employees to embrace its acquisition by Oracle.

Jonathan Schwartz, who became head of the company back in 2006, praised the employees for all the work they had done over the years but also acknowledged that not everybody will be welcomed into the fold at Oracle as the company cuts down its work force, a report from Internet News claimed.

“For those that ultimately won't become a part of Oracle, this will be the first step in a new adventure,” he said. “Sun has a tremendous reputation across the planet, well beyond Silicon Valley. It's a great brand to have on your resume.”

He added: “I'm very confident you'll land on your feet. You're a talented, tenacious group, and there's always opportunity for great people.”

It is still unclear as to whether Schwartz will become part of Oracle himself or leave the company entirely.

Schwartz attempted to reassure those who go on to become part of Larry Ellison’s troop that the move is a good thing and not to look back on days gone by.

“For those that have roles at Oracle, may you start with a clean slate, ready to take on the myriad opportunities ahead with the same passion and tenacity for Oracle's success that you've had for Sun's, and a renewed sense of energy around executing on a far broader mission,” he said.

“There is no doubt in my mind you, and Oracle, will be remarkably successful, beyond the market's wildest expectations. But it's important you come to work thinking 'Sun is a brand, Oracle's my company.' Don't look for ways to preserve or dwell in 'how we used to do things.' Look for ways to help customers, grow the market, and improve Oracle's performance.”

The drawn out acquisition process got a boost late last week as the EU confirmed its support for the deal after an investigation into its possible effect on competition.

However, not all are in favour and MySQL founder Michael "Monty" Widenius is campaigning to ensure that both China and Russia - the final hurdles in the regulatory approval process - say no to the deal.