Intel desktop solid-state drives now shipping

Chip manufacturer starts to ship desktop drives that it claims offers new levels of performance for solid state disks, with enterprise versions on the way.

Intel has begun shipping the solid state disk drives that it first announced at IDF a year ago.

It also claimed that the drives match the ambitious performance claims it outlined at IDF last April.

The shipping drives are the Intel X18-M and the X25-M offering 80GB and 160GB of capacity respectively. Intel claimed that the 80GB drive achieves up to 250MB per second read speeds, up to 70MB per second write speeds and 85-microsecond read latency for fast performance.

Each is based on multi-level cell NAND flash technology and uses the mainstream SATA interface. Intel said in a statement that in its tests, the drives increased system performance by nine times over standard hard disks.

"Validated by our rigorous testing and OEM customer feedback, we believe that we have developed an SSD that delivers on the promises of SSD computing," said Randy Wilhelm, Intel vice president and general manager of the NAND Products Group.

"By combining our experience in flash memory design with our processor and computing expertise, we have added advances such as our parallel 10-channel architecture, proprietary controller, firmware and memory management algorithms that address write amplification and wear levelling issues to redefine SSD performance and reliability for computing platforms."

The 80GB drive is available now and is priced, in batches of 1,000 at $595 (337.13). Intel said customers will have to wait till the fourth quarter of the year to get hold of the 160GB drives.

The company also said that end-customer products using the SSDs would start to ship in a few weeks, and indeed, HP has announced its EliteBook 6930p, that offers an Intel SSD as an option.

Intel also announced its plans to ship an SSD aimed at the enterprise within the next 90 days. This will be called the Intel X25-E Extreme SATA SSD and will be based on single-level cell technology, which sacrifices storage capacity for increased reliability, crucial in mission critical computing.

Intel claimed the drive will enable companies to maximise their Input/Output Operations Per Second (IOPS), improving disk performance and lowering costs.

Featured Resources

Seven steps to connect and empower your frontline workers

How business leaders can improve communication with a secure platform

Free download

Create what’s next

The future of collaboration and productivity

Free Download

Leveraging the cloud without relinquishing control

Your data. Their cloud.

Free download

Re-architecting for nonstop innovation

Unlocking productivity, scalability, and lower costs for cloud natives

Free Download

Recommended

Intel CPU flaw could enable hackers to attack PCs, cars, and medical devices
Hardware

Intel CPU flaw could enable hackers to attack PCs, cars, and medical devices

16 Nov 2021
Intel launches 12th-gen Alder Lake processors optimised for Windows 11
Hardware

Intel launches 12th-gen Alder Lake processors optimised for Windows 11

28 Oct 2021
Intel no longer considering UK chip plant following Brexit
components

Intel no longer considering UK chip plant following Brexit

7 Oct 2021
Rise to the challenge
Whitepaper

Rise to the challenge

1 Oct 2021

Most Popular

What should you really be asking about your remote access software?
Sponsored

What should you really be asking about your remote access software?

17 Nov 2021
How to speed up Microsoft's Windows 11
Microsoft Windows

How to speed up Microsoft's Windows 11

9 Nov 2021
Nike to take customers into the metaverse with 'NIKELAND'
virtualisation

Nike to take customers into the metaverse with 'NIKELAND'

19 Nov 2021