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Shocking news for iPhone users

Dry conditions and iPhones don't mix, according to a warning from Apple about the potential for static electric shocks.

Earphones

Apple has warned that some iPhone and iPod users might get a small electrical shock from their earbuds if they're using the device in very dry conditions.

In such conditions, users can build up static electricity, which then discharges itself through the headphones, according to Apple - who was keen to point out that it does not mean the earbuds are at fault.

Apple also stated the obvious by saying static build up and potential related shocks are not limited to its hardware.

"This condition is very similar to dragging your feet across a carpet and receiving a static shock by touching a door knob," Apple said on its support website.

"However, instead of the static charge building up on your body, the charge builds up on the device that the earbuds are connected to. Likewise, instead of the static buildup discharging through your finger when you touch a door knob, it discharges through the earbuds."

To alleviate the problem, Apple offered some advice for users so that they can enjoy their devices without pain.

"To minimise the risks of electrostatic discharge from the headphones, avoid using the headphones in extremely dry environments or touch a grounded unpainted metal object before inserting the headphones," it said.

Raising the moisture level indoors using a humidifier, using anti-static sprays, trying to limit how frequently you take your device in and out of pockets and keeping the device out of the wind, were all offered up as handy tips by the computing giant.

"If you have dry skin, try anti-static hand lotion Try wearing different clothes. Try clothes with natural fibres since synthetic fibres are more likely to hold a static charge," said Apple.

At the end of last year, Apple warned that some of its iPhone 3G chargers were faulty and offered to exchange them for free.

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