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Timeline: Google Street View scandal

We look back at the Google Street View scandal's history, right up to the ICO investigation's conclusion.

The ICO decided the data Google took in the UK did not amount to anything significant, and so concluded its investigation without any action. Of course, the commissioner would start up another case later in the year.

Earlier in the month, Google had confirmed its Street View cars would be heading back out on the road.

Attorney General for the State of Connecticut Richard Blumenthal returned to threaten Google with legal action if "complete, comprehensive answers" were not given.

August 2010

Google's Seoul office was raided by South Korean police as they continued their investigation around data collection by Street View cars.

October 2010

Google came out and admitted that among the data collected during the Street View operation were passwords, emails and URLs. Subsequently, the ICO reopened its investigation and said it would consider using its "enforcement powers."

The Federal Trade Commission decided to drop its own investigation into the search giant, which is let off the hook once again. Federal regulators agreed Google had done enough in addressing privacy concerns. Google still faces cases from more than 30 US state prosecutors.

At a parliamentary debate, minister for culture Ed Vaizey confirmed the ICO would not be able to issue a fine against Google and the search giant had escaped an investigation from the Metropolitan Police.

November 2010

The ICO said it will not be pressured into making a snap decision over Google, stressing it "must take a calm and measured approach." The watchdog also noted it needed to "remain evidence based."

The body came out two days later to say Google would not be fined, but instead would have its data protection practices audited by the ICO and sign an undertaking to ensure data protection breaches do not happen again.

Privacy groups were not impressed. Open Rights Group's Jim Killock said the ICO was "behaving like a lapdog, not a watchdog."

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