Apple MacBook Pro 17in Thunderbolt review

The latest 17in MacBook Pro is Apple's most powerful laptop yet thanks to its quad-core Sandy Bridge processor and new Thunderbolt port. But are these enough to justify its high price?

The Thunderbolt-equipped MacBook Pro desktop replacement laptop
Price
£1,679

We don't often review desktop replacement laptops since we don't really see the point of a laptop that's too heavy to actually take anywhere on a regular basis. We decided to take a look at the new 17in 3kg MacBook Pro though as it's not only the first laptop from a major manufacturer to come with a new Intel Sandy Bridge processor, but it's also the first to come with a Thunderbolt port.

Thunderbolt is an exciting new port and cable technology from Intel that could leave USB3 in the dust. We've already taken an in-depth look at Thunderbolt and its potential for both video and storage peripherals is very promising. At the moment though it's of little practical use as there are no Thunderbolt peripherals available, but with Apple including the port on all its MacBook Pro laptops, hopefully it will take off soon.

The Thunderbolt port isn't useless though it's backwards compatible with existing Mini DisplayPort monitors and, using adapters sold separately, HDMI, VGA and DVI-equipped monitors and projectors too. We do wish at least one of these adapters had been included in the box since Mini DisplayPort monitors are fairly rare. There are also three USB2 ports and a FireWire 800 port. There aren't any USB3 ports or a SD card reader, but these can easily be added using the ExpressCard/34 expansion card slot the 17in model is the only one in Apple's laptop range to have this slot.

The 17in MacBook Pro comes with a quad-core 2.2GHz Core i7 2720QM processor and 4GB of RAM. It sped through our benchmarks with a high overall score of 165. It's the fastest laptop we've seen yet so it shouldn't have any trouble handling demanding applications for some to come. The normally whisper-quiet fan did become noticeably louder and part of the aluminium underside did become very warm when our demanding benchmarks were running though.

Featured Resources

Managing security risk and compliance in a challenging landscape

How key technology partners grow with your organisation

Download now

Security best practices for PostgreSQL

Securing data with PostgreSQL

Download now

Transform your MSP business into a money-making machine

Benefits and challenges of a recurring revenue model

Download now

The care and feeding of cloud

How to support cloud infrastructure post-migration

Watch now

Most Popular

Microsoft is submerging servers in boiling liquid to prevent Teams outages
data centres

Microsoft is submerging servers in boiling liquid to prevent Teams outages

7 Apr 2021
Data belonging to 500 million LinkedIn users found for sale on hacker marketplace
hacking

Data belonging to 500 million LinkedIn users found for sale on hacker marketplace

8 Apr 2021
Alienware’s new gaming laptop is a kick in the teeth for Intel’s new CEO
Hardware

Alienware’s new gaming laptop is a kick in the teeth for Intel’s new CEO

8 Apr 2021