HP t410 All-in-One Thin Client review: First look

HP's forthcoming 18.5in All-in-One thin client is powered by an Ethernet cable. We managed to get some hands on time with it for a first look review.

HP debuted an All-in-One thin client, which requires just 13 watts and uses Power over Ethernet (PoE) technology.

The HP t410 All-in-One (AiO) Smart Zero Client comes with an 18.5in display and an ARM-based processor that allows this low level of power consumption.

HP t410 All-in-One - Virtual desktop

The HP t410 All-in-One looks like any other monitor from the front and has a touted brightness of 200 nits

From a couple of metres away the device looks like a standard monitor. Up close you'll notice a slight protrusion on the back, which accommodates the extra components.

But you'll only realise there is something unique about the t410 when you notice the absence of the power cable. Incidentally, HP does supply one, so the device can be deployed in environments where PoE is not available.

HP t410 All-in-One - Ethernet

Only an Ethernet cable is needed to power the t410

Despite using low-power, HP doesn't appear to have compromised performance with the t410. The Digital Signal Processor is able to carry out complex tasks such as HD video playback.

An HP engineer noted the device uses auto-sensing technology so it can scan and connect to environments hosted by Citrix, Microsoft or VMware.

HP claims the 18.5in display has a brightness of 200nits, which is as bright as a laptop on full power. From our initial encounter, the display looked bright, especially in the low-light surroundings.

A potential problem could be the automatic detection. The t410 adjusts brightness depending on how much power is available from the network switch. In theory, this could cause brightness to fluctuate, which might be a cause of frustration for users.

HP t410 All-in-One - Ports

There are four USB ports and a combined mic/audio jack

In terms of connectivity, the 18.5in monitor comes with four USB ports, and a microphone/audio jack. HP provides a mouse and keyboard as part of the package - so users will be able to start working out-of-the-box.

HP claims it is designed to be used in hospitals, media and entertainment industries, but we can easily see the t410 being deployed in office environments. The device will suit employees who spend the majority of time working with documents, rather than multimedia content.

HP is touting a price of $429, with UK pricing to be confirmed. This may seem a little on the high side, but potential energy savings could make a worthwhile investment for large enterprises.

Verdict

An unique All-in-One 18.5in display, which takes us one step closer to a cable free world. The t410 shows ARM-based chips are capable of powering large devices and could be SMBs and enterprises to consider virtualisation.

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