Samsung Galaxy Note 10.1 review: Best and worst features

The 10.1in Android tablet comes with a stylus, true-multitasking, a quad-core processor and the option of voice calling.

The Galaxy Note 10.1 is the latest effort from Samsung to counter the iPad. Samsung has beefed up the specifications, shipping the device with a quad-core processor and 2GB of RAM. The firm has also enhanced multi-tasking support and added a stylus to the mix.

The tablet has the same 399 starting price as the iPad 3, but the 3G edition of the Note also adds voice calling functionality, something which could appeal to business users. IT Pro takes a look at the best and worst features of the device to see if it's worth the investment.

Best

5. Enterprise support

Samsung has pushed enterprise support to gain traction with business users. The Galaxy Note 10.1 comes with standard features such as Exchange ActiveSync support, with beefed up encryption thanks to Android ICS. The firm has also included compatibility with Cisco VPN and Juniper's Junos Pulse VPN.

The device will be compatible with mobile device management software from firms such as AirWatch, Sybase and MobileIron, so it can be deployed and controlled by IT admins in the workplace.

4. Specifications

The entry level 16GB Wi-Fi only edition features a 10.1in 1280 x 800 resolution display. Although we like the use of Gorilla Glass, we're disappointed Samsung didn't use a higher resolution.

The Note 10.1 isn't able to provide the clarity we've seen on the Asus Transfromer Pad Infinity (1,920 x 1,280) or the iPad 3 (2,048 x 1536). However, the 16:10 aspect ratio and support for a wide range of formats including 3GP(MP4), WMV(ASF), AVI, FLV, MKV and WebM make the Note well suited to playing videos.

Despite not making a drastic improvement to the screen, Samsung has enhanced internal components. The tablet comes with a 1.4GHz quad-core ARM-based processor, 2GB of RAM, a 7,000mAh battery and two cameras (5-megapixel on the rear and 1.9-megapixel on the front). We found the rear camera replicated colours well in test shots, but using the 4x zoom did lead to a touch of noise.

General performance of the device was quick, with the device clocking a reasonably high score of 952 in the Geekbench, processor and memory benchmark. In terms of real world testing we couldn't fault performance. We found there to be no lag when opening, closing or switching between apps.

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