Amazon set to snub Google Maps and team with Nokia, claims sources

Internet retail giant's next generation Kindle Fire will not feature Google Maps, insiders claim.

Change ahead

Amazon.com's new Kindle Fire will have mapping services via a tie-up with Nokia Oyj, sources claim, filling a gap in the tablet's capabilities while snubbing Google's popular service.

The world's largest internet retailer, which says its nine-month old Kindle Fire now accounts for one in five US tablet sales, has teamed up with Nokia on mapping, the two people told Reuters.

Amazon will release at least one new version of the Kindle Fire next Thursday.

Amazon will also add location capabilities to the new Kindle Fire, which requires either a GPS chip or a process known as WiFi triangulation, the sources added.

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Mapping services, which are popular features on tablets, typically include street maps, information about local businesses and sometimes traffic status. They can also support navigation instructions and third-party applications that depend on location information, such as travel services.

Location capabilities mark the location of tablet and smart phone users.

Google's Nexus 7 tablet, which competes directly with the Kindle Fire, comes with GPS receiver chips to support location and mapping functions.

The first Kindle Fire launched last year and at $199 costs half the price of the entry-level Apple iPad, helping it rapidly gain consumer acceptance. On Thursday, Amazon said its Kindle Fires had completely sold out.

Analysts say the 7-inch device helps drive sales of digital media such as ebooks and music, which in turn propels core retail growth for the company.

Amazon may unveil larger versions of the Fire on Thursday in Los Angeles, analysts and media say, which will compete more directly with the iPad.

Although the Kindle now runs on an early version of Google's Android, which Amazon developed into its own operating system, it does not integrate Google Maps into the device. That means users had to access Google Maps via a Web browser, or download map apps from third-party developers.

A Nokia spokesman declined to comment and an Amazon spokeswoman did not respond to requests for comment.

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