Malware prototype exposes smartcard security flaws

Proof-of-concept trojan gives cybercriminals access to sensitive data with just an internet connection

Hand coming out of screen stealing credit card

A research team from IT security consultancy itrust have created a proof-of-concept malware that lets attackers gain access to smartcard readers attached to infected Windows PCs via the internet.

The attack happens when a smartcard reader is connected to the affected computer via USB.

The malware installs a driver onto the USB device that allows the attacker to access information on the victim's smartcard as if it were attached to their own PC.

Advertisement - Article continues below

The researchers, led by IT security consultant Paul Rascagneres, used the Belgian eID national electronic identity card and a selection of smartcards used by Belgian banks to test drive the malware prototype.

As with the British Chip and PIN credit and debit cards, most smartcards use a PIN or password as a secondary authentication method to enhance security.

However, the malware developed by the itrust team also contains a keylogger that can steal these credentials as unwitting users type them on their keyboard.

Victims are unlikely to be unaware they have been attacked until they suffer some kind of identity or financial fraud.

Rascagneres claims the attack is completely transparent to the user as they will not be prevented from using their card reader in the usual way.

Advertisement
Advertisement - Article continues below

Marcin Kleczynski, CEO of Malwarebytes told IT Pro: "The research is another clear indicator of the fact that intelligent malware can breach even the most seemingly watertight counter-measure."

Advertisement - Article continues below

"There has been a massive increase in the value of sensitive business data amongst the criminal underground, so breaches such as this, using new attack vectors, will only increase," Kleczynski added.

A full exposition of the development of the prototype and the threat this kind of malware poses will be delivered in a presentation by Rascagneres, entitled Smartcards Reloaded Remotely! at the upcoming MalCon security conference in New Dehli on 24 November.

Featured Resources

The case for a marketing content hub

Transform your digital marketing to deliver customer expectations

Download now

Fast, flexible and compliant e-signatures for global businesses

Be at the forefront of digital transformation with electronic signatures

Download now

Why CEOS should care about the move to SAP S/4HANA

And how they can accelerate business value

Download now

IT faces new security challenges in the wake of COVID-19

Beat the crisis by learning how to secure your network

Download now
Advertisement

Recommended

Visit/security/30081/what-is-a-trojan-virus
Security

What is a Trojan?

24 Apr 2020
Visit/security/encryption/355820/k2view-innovates-in-data-management-with-new-encryption-patent
encryption

K2View innovates in data management with new encryption patent

28 May 2020
Visit/software/video-conferencing/355410/zoom-50-adds-256-bit-encryption-and-ui-refresh
video conferencing

Zoom 5.0 adds 256-bit encryption to address security concerns

23 Apr 2020
Visit/security/hacking/355382/whatsapps-flaw-shoulder-surfing
hacking

WhatsApp flaw leaves users open to 'shoulder surfing' attacks

21 Apr 2020

Most Popular

Visit/operating-systems/microsoft-windows/355812/microsoft-warns-against-installing-windows-10-may-2020
Microsoft Windows

Microsoft warns users not to install Windows 10's May update

28 May 2020
Visit/security/data-breaches/355777/easyjet-faces-class-action-lawsuit-over-data-breach
data breaches

EasyJet faces class-action lawsuit over data breach

26 May 2020
Visit/security/cyber-security/355797/microsoft-bans-trend-micros-rootkit-buster-from-windows-10
cyber security

Microsoft bans Trend Micro driver from Windows 10 for "cheating" hardware tests

27 May 2020