Apple might ditch Qualcomm for in-house modems

Reports suggest the technology giant has already begun building cellular chips for use in future iPhones

An Apple store front in China

Apple is reportedly building its own cellular modems to use in future iPhones and iPads in order to lessen its reliance on Qualcomm technology. 

The company's senior VP of hardware technologies, Johny Srouji, revealed the move in a meeting with Apple employees on Thursday, according to Bloomberg

Last month the tech giant launched new a MacBook Air, Macbook Pro, and Mac Mini with its own in-house ARM chips instead of Intel processors. The switch went down well with critics and consumers, and it seems the firm is looking to do the same with cellular modems.

"This year, we kicked off the development of our first internal cellular modem which will enable another key strategic transition," Srouji said, according to Bloomberg. "Long-term strategic investments like these are a critical part of enabling our products and making sure we have a rich pipeline of innovative technologies for our future."

News of an in-house modem will not come as a surprise to many that have been following Apple's work with both Intel and Qualcomm. In July, the iPhone maker acquired the former's smartphone modem business, which indicated that it was only a matter of time before Apple would launch its own hardware. 

Apple and Qualcomm are also not the happiest of partners; ahead of the Intel unit purchase, Apple reached a surprise settlement with Qualcomm over patent infringements. The two had been locked in a legal war for the best part of two years before the iPhone maker sought a financial resolution. 

Part of the settlement involved a multi-year deal with Qualcomm for a reported $4.5 billion. Apple is thought to have been forced into the deal because it needed Qualcomm tech in order to launch this year's 5G-capable iPhone 12, but there are still around five years left on that agreement.

The suggestion here is that Apple might be using a combination of Qualcomm and its own chips over the next few years - or it takes a loss on the agreement.  

Featured Resources

Modern governance: The how-to guide

Equipping organisations with the right tools for business resilience

Free Download

Cloud operational excellence

Everything you need to know about optimising your cloud operations

Watch now

A buyer’s guide to board management software

Improve your board’s performance

The real world business value of Oracle autonomous data warehouse

Lead with a 417% five-year ROI

Download now

Recommended

Global smartphone shipments grow for the first time in four years
Mobile Phones

Global smartphone shipments grow for the first time in four years

28 Jan 2022
Apple will let businesses accept payments on iPhones without the need for extra hardware
Mobile Phones

Apple will let businesses accept payments on iPhones without the need for extra hardware

27 Jan 2022
Apple fixes array of iOS, macOS zero-days and code execution security flaws
zero-day exploit

Apple fixes array of iOS, macOS zero-days and code execution security flaws

27 Jan 2022
Safari bug lets websites track browsing activity and unique identifiers
web browser

Safari bug lets websites track browsing activity and unique identifiers

18 Jan 2022

Most Popular

Dell XPS 15 (2021) review: The best just got better
Laptops

Dell XPS 15 (2021) review: The best just got better

14 Jan 2022
Sony pulls out of MWC 2022
Business operations

Sony pulls out of MWC 2022

14 Jan 2022
Synology DiskStation DS2422+ review: A cube of great capacity
network attached storage (NAS)

Synology DiskStation DS2422+ review: A cube of great capacity

10 Jan 2022