IT Pro is supported by its audience. When you purchase through links on our site, we may earn an affiliate commission. Learn more

Microsoft burns its bra

Computerised underwear may not be on the agenda, but wearable computing still offers plentiful opportunities.

OPINION: What do you get if you cross tech researchers, ladies' underwear and the internet?

A great deal of overexcitement at least that's what Microsoft found out recently after designs for a "smart bra" some of its researchers had worked on were published earlier this month.

Microsoft Research, the department of the Redmond giant whose mandate is to "push the boundaries of computing," collaborated with the University of Rochester, New York, and the University of Southampton, UK, on a project to help reduce emotional eating in women.

The purpose of the research, which can be read in full here, was to come up with a way of detecting mood changes through wearable technology and use an app to help users react to and manage these mood changes in a way that didn't involve eating.

The researchers settled on a bra as they needed "a form factor that would be comfortable when worn for long durations ... [and] a way to gather both [ECG] and EDA (electrodermal activity) signals."

Well, if there are two things the internet loves, it's kittens and boobs and the "smart bra" certainly caught the imagination so much so that Microsoft has been forced to issue a denial that it is actually developing such a device.

"The bra sensing system is just one instance of a class of work from a group of Microsoft researchers who are focused on the broader topic of affective computing, or designing devices and services that are sensitive to people's moods and react accordingly," the company told NPR.

"While we will continue our research in affective computing, Microsoft has no plans to develop a bra with sensors."

So no diet-control bras from Redmond just now (the research paper indicates those involved were looking at moving to bracelets anyway, so men could participate too), but that doesn't mean an end to affective computing, also known as the quantified self movement.

Featured Resources

The state of Salesforce: Future of business

Three articles that look forward into the changing state of Salesforce and the future of business

Free Download

The mighty struggle to migrate SAP to the cloud may be over

A simplified and unified approach to delivering Enterprise Transformation in the cloud

Free Download

The business value of the transformative mainframe

Modernising on the mainframe

Free Download

The Total Economic Impact™ Of IBM FlashSystem

Cost savings and business benefits enabled by FlashSystem

Free Download

Recommended

Microsoft blocking Tutanota users from Teams registration, claims fix unfeasible
Business operations

Microsoft blocking Tutanota users from Teams registration, claims fix unfeasible

8 Aug 2022
Microsoft wins five-year digital transformation deal with Australia’s largest telco
digital transformation

Microsoft wins five-year digital transformation deal with Australia’s largest telco

26 Jul 2022
Slack Connect vs Microsoft Teams Connect: Better than email?
collaboration

Slack Connect vs Microsoft Teams Connect: Better than email?

20 Jul 2022
Microsoft announces simulator for autonomous aircraft development
Cloud

Microsoft announces simulator for autonomous aircraft development

20 Jul 2022

Most Popular

Cyber attack on software supplier causes "major outage" across the NHS
cyber attacks

Cyber attack on software supplier causes "major outage" across the NHS

8 Aug 2022
Why convenience is the biggest threat to your security
Sponsored

Why convenience is the biggest threat to your security

8 Aug 2022
How to boot Windows 11 in Safe Mode
Microsoft Windows

How to boot Windows 11 in Safe Mode

29 Jul 2022