Microsoft burns its bra

Computerised underwear may not be on the agenda, but wearable computing still offers plentiful opportunities.

Jawbone

Fitbit

It's not hard to imagine productivity monitors, devices to ensure that we sedentary workers get enough screen breaks, health and safety-focused wearables, or devices that could lead to improved training targeting.

Within the enterprise, there are devices like Google Glass, which I have seen used as a wearable teleprompter (a proxiprompter, perhaps?) during a presentation, and wrist-mounted screens like Samsung's Galaxy Gear.

It's fair to say we are just on the cusp of the wearable computing revolution and, as with cloud, it seems to be something that is starting in the consumer world but will be leaking into the business world. It's not hard to imagine productivity monitors, devices to ensure that we sedentary workers get enough screen breaks, health and safety-focused wearables, or devices that could lead to improved training targeting.

Who knows what the future holds? The only thing we can know for sure is there will be no computerised bras. At least, not just yet.

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