iOS app uses Healthkit data to predict deaths

The app for iPads and iPhones uses HealthKit data to work out how long users will live for

Calendar

An iPhone app has showcased how Apple's HealthKit data can be used to monitor health and predict when users are likely to die.

Deadline collates information tracked on Apple's health platform and combines this with data users provide to work out when they'll die, based on their living habits via an algorithm that mixes all this information up to come up with a number.

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When it's worked out your death day, it gives a countdown to that date, which is also viewable direct from your iPhone's Today screen with a widget, so users can be constantly reminded of how much time they have left on earth.

The app's description says: "You're going to die. Sorry, we all do eventually. I don't want to, either. But, what if you knew the date of your death?

"Deadline uses statistical information to attempt to determine your date of expiration, but no app can really accurately determine when you will die, so consider this a way to motivate yourself to be healthier, and consult a physician as necessary."

Presumably, the more exercise users do and the healthier they live, the timer will adjust and give them more time to live life to the full. In a similar vein, if users' living habits get worse, they may see the time they have left dwindle away faster.

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Deadline costs 69p from the App Store, although with only a 1.5 star rating, it would seem not everyone's happy to find out when they're going to die. However, reviews seem to be a little more positive with users focusing on the benefits of knowing when they're going to die as a key motivator to make changes to their life.

Although the app is a pretty morbid one (and probably shouldn't be taken too seriously), it's a great example of what can be done with Apple's HealthKit API.

Google has also launched its alternative to Apple's developer platform called Google Fit, so expect to see more of these apps rolling out in the coming months, but hopefully with a less scary purpose.

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