After Stagefright, Samsung and LG plan monthly bug patches

The companies are responding to attacks that have hit Google's Android platform over the last few months

Samsung and LG have announced they will work with Google to roll out monthly security patches to their Android-powered devices, a week after the Stagefright bug was discovered.

The Stagefright bug is said to affect more than 95 per cent of all Android smartphones and can be passed from device to device by video and picture messages.

After security researcher Joshua Drake uncovered the flaw, critics have attacked both Google and Android phone makers for failing to quickly roll out security patches to fix such widespread bugs.

Google did issue an update to selected Android devices soon after the company learnt of the bug, but the time it took to roll out it meant many users were open to attack for longer than they should have been.

Although Google is always the first to fix problems like this, it only rolls patches out to its own-branded Nexus devices, leaving other phone manufacturers out in the cold.

However, it has vowed to push the updates out faster and will issue a monthly update schedule to try to ensure bugs like Stagefright do not infect phones.

Samsung has now followed Google's lead and said it will also start an update programme to ensure no device goes unprotected and this means issuing a patch as quickly as possible to users.

"With the recent security issues, we have been rethinking the approach to getting security updates to our devices in a more timely manner," Dong Jin Koh, Samsung's head of mobile research and development, said.

"Since software is constantly exploited in new ways, developing a fast response process to deliver security patches to our devices is critical to keep them protected. We believe that this new process will vastly improve the security of our devices and will aim to provide the best mobile experience possible for our users."

Google also said it will continue to support devices up to 18 months after it withdraws units from sale, meaning customers will be protected even if they buy a handset as it's being phased out.

Featured Resources

Defeating ransomware with unified security from WatchGuard

How SMBs can defend against the onslaught of ransomware attacks

Free download

The IT expert’s guide to AI and content management

How artificial intelligence and machine learning could be critical to your business

Free download

The path to CX excellence

Four stages to thrive in the experience economy

Free download

Becoming an experience-based business

Your blueprint for a strong digital foundation

Free download

Recommended

New malware uses search engine ads to target pirate gamers
malware

New malware uses search engine ads to target pirate gamers

21 Jul 2021
HackBoss malware is using Telegram to steal cryptocurrency from other hackers
cryptocurrencies

HackBoss malware is using Telegram to steal cryptocurrency from other hackers

16 Apr 2021

Most Popular

What are the pros and cons of AI?
machine learning

What are the pros and cons of AI?

8 Sep 2021
Citrix mulling potential sale after tumultuous 2021
mergers and acquisitions

Citrix mulling potential sale after tumultuous 2021

15 Sep 2021
Hackers develop Linux port of Cobalt Strike for new attacks
Security

Hackers develop Linux port of Cobalt Strike for new attacks

14 Sep 2021