IT Pro is supported by its audience. When you purchase through links on our site, we may earn an affiliate commission. Learn more

Apple recycling partner accused of reselling over 100,000 devices

Legal complaint accuses Geep Canada of illegally selling 103,845 iPhone, iPad and Apple Watch devices

Rubber gloved hands disassembling an iPhone

Apple is suing a company it hired to recycle thousands of iPhones, iPads and Apple Watches for allegedly trying to resell them. 

Geep Canada is accused of stealing and reselling at least 103,845 Apple products, according to the legal complaint reported by The Logic

The tech giant sent the recycling firm over 500,000 iPhones, iPads and Apple watches to be disassembled between January 2015 and December 2017. However, during an audit, Apple claims it discovered that 18% of those devices were still accessing the internet through cellular networks

Geep, which is now owned by Quantum Lifecycle Partners, offered multiple e-waste management services, but its website also stated that its mission was to "encourage reuse whenever possible".

"Products sent for recycling are no longer adequate to sell to consumers and if they are rebuilt with counterfeit parts they could cause serious safety issues, including electrical or battery defects," the company told The Verge

What's more, that 18% figure doesn't include products without cellular radio, according to Apple, which suggests the actual number of stolen goods is higher. As such, the company is after at least $31 million Canadian dollars (£18 million) from its former partner. 

"At least 11,766 pounds of Apple devices left Geep's premises without being destroyed - a fact that Geep itself confirmed," Apple's complaint states.

Geep has denied all wrongdoing and has filed its own lawsuit against three former employees. It claims they stole the devices on their own behalf. Apple has also argued this, claiming the employees were actually senior management at Geep.

Apple, along with other tech companies, has been trying to lessen its impact on the environment. This has often been by using third-party companies to disassemble products to find reusable components. Over the last couple of years, the company has made investments to bring that in-house, including two disassembly robots, Daisy and Dave, which recover iPhone parts. 

Featured Resources

Join the 90% of enterprises accelerating to the cloud

Business transformation through digital modernisation

Free Download

Delivering on demand: Momentum builds toward flexible IT

A modern digital workplace strategy

Free download

Modernise the workforce experience

Actionable insights and an optimised experience for both IT and end users

Free Download

The digital workplace roadmap

A leader's guide to strategy and success

Free Download

Recommended

Best business smartphones 2022: The top handsets from Apple, Samsung, Google and more
Mobile

Best business smartphones 2022: The top handsets from Apple, Samsung, Google and more

23 Jun 2022
Apple faces a catch-22 decision with iPhones and USB-C
Policy & legislation

Apple faces a catch-22 decision with iPhones and USB-C

8 Jun 2022
Apple overhauls SwiftUI navigation and brings a score of new features to developers at WWDC 2022
software development

Apple overhauls SwiftUI navigation and brings a score of new features to developers at WWDC 2022

7 Jun 2022
The EU’s Apple App Store crackdown ‘will fuel cyber attacks’
cyber security

The EU’s Apple App Store crackdown ‘will fuel cyber attacks’

1 Jun 2022

Most Popular

Universities are fighting a cyber security war on multiple fronts
cyber security

Universities are fighting a cyber security war on multiple fronts

4 Jul 2022
Hackers claim to steal personal data of over a billion people in China
data breaches

Hackers claim to steal personal data of over a billion people in China

4 Jul 2022
Raspberry Pi launches next-gen Pico W microcontroller with networking support
Hardware

Raspberry Pi launches next-gen Pico W microcontroller with networking support

1 Jul 2022