A TV licence phishing scam has driven over 5,000 complaints

Action Fraud states that 5,057 people have complained about the phishing attempt in the last three months

phishing

A phishing scam using TV licence renewal as bait has been circulating email inboxes around the UK, driving 5,057 complaints according to Action Fraud.

The email, which tricks people into opening it with headings about licence expiry and incorrect information, leads victims through to a page where they're required to enter their account number, sort code and card verification number everything needed for scammers to steal money from innocent victims.

In some cases, the page asks for more information that could be used for identity theft or future social engineering, including a name, date of birth, address, phone number, email address and mother's maiden name.

The emails themselves look worryingly convincing, and headlines like "correct your licensing information" and "your TV licence expires today" feel suitably formal, too. A spokesperson for TV Licencing was quite clear, however: "TV Licensing will never email customers, unprompted, to ask for bank details, personal information or tell you that you may be entitled to a refund."

Advertisement
Advertisement - Article continues below
Advertisement - Article continues below

TV Licencing's phishing section of its FAQ has been updated with details of the latest scam, and it's unequivocal in its instructions: "If you receive a similar email message, please delete it. If you have already clicked the link, do not enter or submit any information.

"If you have entered personal information as a result of this fraudulent email you should report the fraud to the Action Fraud Helpline or by calling 0300 123 2040. If you have submitted any bank or card details, please speak to your bank immediately."

This isn't the first time the TV licence has been used as the bait in a phishing campaign. Back in 2017, Action Fraud heard from more than 200 people who have received fake emails promising them a rebate on their licence fee, if they just entered their bank details. Suffice it to say that those that did found themselves losing money, rather than gaining it.

Featured Resources

Digital Risk Report 2020

A global view into the impact of digital transformation on risk and security management

Download now

6 ways your business could suffer if you don’t backup Office 365

Office 365 makes it easy to lose valuable data regularly, unpredictably, unintentionally, and for good

Download now

Get the best out of your workforce

7 steps to unleashing their true potential with robotic process automation

Download now

8 digital best practices for IT professionals

Don't leave anything to chance when going digital

Download now
Advertisement

Most Popular

Visit/mobile/28299/how-to-use-chromecast-without-wi-fi
Mobile

How to use Chromecast without Wi-Fi

5 Feb 2020
Visit/policy-legislation/data-protection/354814/google-to-shift-uk-user-data-to-the-us-post-brexit
data protection

Google to shift UK user data to the US post-Brexit

20 Feb 2020
Visit/operating-systems/27717/how-to-fix-a-stuck-windows-10-update
operating systems

How to fix a stuck Windows 10 update

12 Feb 2020
Visit/security/cyber-security/354827/mcafee-researchers-trick-tesla-autopilot-with-a-strip-of-tape
cyber security

McAfee researchers trick Tesla autopilot with a strip of tape

21 Feb 2020