Pavlok electric shock wristband could be security risk

The wristband that supposedly stops over-spending could be hacked according to Kaspersky Lab

The Pavlok electric shock wristband, which has been designed to stop people over-spending, could present a security risk, Kaspersky Lab has suggested.

Because the wristband connects to your bank account and uses the internet to work, it could be hacked, exposing your bank details to any criminals who wish to mine such data.

"Following the news of the Pavlok wristband which conditions wearers into good spending behaviour by using shock therapy, it is important to factor in the security implications of such wearable devices," Liviu Itoafa, security researcher at Kaspersky Lab, said.

"Wearables face the same security threats as traditional computers. In fact, innovative devices are sometimes even more susceptible to traditional threats. Perhaps even worse yet, in time, these devices will face innovative threats."

Advertisement
Advertisement - Article continues below
Advertisement - Article continues below

The wristband works by keeping tabs on your spending via an app and when it thinks you've spent too much in a certain period of time, it will generate an electric shock in the hope you'll stop splashing cash.

"Wherever devices are used, whatever the technology they're based on, all mobile endpoints that can connect to a network need to be fully secured by the developer ahead of use," Itoafa continued.

Although the wristband is designed for use by consumers rather than businesses, it serves as a reminder to everyone that werabales, especially those that are connected to a corporate network, can pose a risk to both the user and the company as a whole.

"As a further extension of BYOD it needs to be seen within the same overall process. In light of this, companies should review their security strategy to include WYOD (Wear Your Own Device)," Itoafa warned.

"This includes assessing the benefits this technology might bring, and determining the risks and putting in place a strategy to manage it, such as mobile security policies that not only overcome complexity and protect against malware, but also allow for simple human error, loss and theft."

Featured Resources

What you need to know about migrating to SAP S/4HANA

Factors to assess how and when to begin migration

Download now

Your enterprise cloud solutions guide

Infrastructure designed to meet your company's IT needs for next-generation cloud applications

Download now

Testing for compliance just became easier

How you can use technology to ensure compliance in your organisation

Download now

Best practices for implementing security awareness training

How to develop a security awareness programme that will actually change behaviour

Download now
Advertisement

Recommended

Visit/security/internet-security/354417/avast-and-avg-extensions-pulled-from-chrome
internet security

Avast and AVG extensions pulled from Chrome

19 Dec 2019
Visit/security/354156/google-confirms-android-cameras-can-be-hijacked-to-spy-on-you
Security

Google confirms Android cameras can be hijacked to spy on you

20 Nov 2019

Most Popular

Visit/policy-legislation/data-governance/354496/brexit-security-talks-under-threat-after-uk-accused-of
data governance

Brexit security talks under threat after UK accused of illegally copying Schengen data

10 Jan 2020
Visit/operating-systems/microsoft-windows/354526/memes-and-viking-funerals-the-internet-reacts-to-the
Microsoft Windows

Memes and Viking funerals: The internet reacts to the death of Windows 7

14 Jan 2020
Visit/network-internet/broadband/354530/openreach-offers-free-full-fibre-installation-for-thousands-of
broadband

Openreach offers free full-fibre installation for thousands of homes

14 Jan 2020
Visit/security/vulnerability/354524/microsoft-to-patch-extraordinarily-serious-cryptographic-flaw
vulnerability

Microsoft to patch ‘extraordinarily serious’ cryptographic flaw

14 Jan 2020