35% of websites still rely on weak SHA-1 encryption

Google, Microsoft and Mozilla will stop supporting unsecure sites by the end of 2017

Despite the biggest search engines and browser developers saying they will stop supporting websites using SHA-1 certificates next year, 35% of companies are still using them.

Research by Venafi Labs revealed up to 61 million websites will be affected, with Chrome, Firefox and Edge all displaying messages saying the websites are unsecure when a user attempts to access them.

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Other things users may experience include the websites not displaying properly, as browsers strip out non-secure elements, no green padlock appearing and in extreme cases, the websites may be blocked.

"Our whole online world is predicated on the system of trust that is underpinned by these certificates; organisations have an obligation to ensure that this is fixed," commented Kevin Bocek, chief security strategist at Venafi.

"Leaving SHA-1 certificates in place is a like putting up a welcome sign for hackers that says, We don't care about security of our applications, data, and customers."

The reason browser developers are planning to block access to sites using the outdated SHA-1 protocol is the certificates can be easily manipulated by hackers. For example, they can be intercepted and then used to launch man-in-the-middle attacks using TLS connections.

The more secure SHA-2 certificates are more robust, but it would seem some companies are holding back from updating their site security.

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"The average organization has over 23,000 keys and certificates and most organizations don't have the tools or visibility to find all the SHA-1 certificates in their environment," Bocek added.

"This means migration to SHA-2 can be complex and chaotic, and, as a result, many businesses have just stuck their heads in the sand. Unfortunately, in January there will be nowhere for these businesses to hide. My advice is to get a plan in place now because it will be even more difficult to fix after the deprecation deadline when things start to break."

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