Bose admits ransomware attack exposed employee data

Hackers managed to obtain HR data including "compensation-related information" during the March attack

Bose has confirmed that it had experienced a data breach, having fallen victim to a ransomware attack in early March.

The audio equipment manufacturer admitted to the incident in a letter sent to the office of the Attorney General at the New Hampshire Consumer Protection Bureau last week. In the filing, the company's legal representative said that Bose had "experienced a sophisticated cyber-incident that resulted in the deployment of malware/ransomware across [its] environment". The incident is only known to have affected Bose's US systems.

"Immediately upon discovering the attack on March 7, Bose initiated incident response protocols, activated its technical team to contain the incident, and hardened its defenses against unauthorized activity," the letter continued.

In late April, the company's investigation found that hackers managed to obtain HR data "relating to six former New Hampshire employees", including "name, Social Security Number, and compensation-related information".

Although Bose's investigators could not find "evidence to confirm that the data contained in these files was successfully exfiltrated", the company was also "unable to confirm that it was not".

According to Bose's representative, the company has taken steps to further investigate the data breach by cooperating with the FBI as well as employing "experts to monitor the dark web for any indications of leaked data".

The company has also sought to mitigate the chances of a future cyber attack occurring by enhancing its server and endpoint security, performing "detailed forensics analysis on the impacted server to analyse the impact of the malware/ransomware", and "enhanced monitoring and logging to identify any future actions by the threat actor or similar types of attacks".

It also confirmed that the malicious files used during the attack, as well as "newly identified malicious sites and IPs linked to this threat actor", had been blocked.

Bose Media Relations Director Joanne Berthiaume told IT Pro that the company had not made "any ransom payment".

The identity of the hackers is not known, but the incident follows in the footsteps of several other recent high-profile ransomware attacks that targeted Colonial Pipeline, as well as the Irish and New Zealand health services.

Featured Resources

Modern governance: The how-to guide

Equipping organisations with the right tools for business resilience

Free Download

Cloud operational excellence

Everything you need to know about optimising your cloud operations

Watch now

A buyer’s guide to board management software

Improve your board’s performance

The real world business value of Oracle autonomous data warehouse

Lead with a 417% five-year ROI

Download now

Recommended

UK's first government cyber strategy aims to bolster public sector defences
cyber security

UK's first government cyber strategy aims to bolster public sector defences

25 Jan 2022
IT Pro Podcast: Learning to live with risk
Sponsored

IT Pro Podcast: Learning to live with risk

25 Jan 2022
Russia's "politically motivated" REvil raid could be used as leverage, experts warn
ransomware

Russia's "politically motivated" REvil raid could be used as leverage, experts warn

17 Jan 2022
Meta files lawsuit to uncover hackers targeting Facebook, WhatsApp
phishing

Meta files lawsuit to uncover hackers targeting Facebook, WhatsApp

21 Dec 2021

Most Popular

Dell XPS 15 (2021) review: The best just got better
Laptops

Dell XPS 15 (2021) review: The best just got better

14 Jan 2022
Sony pulls out of MWC 2022
Business operations

Sony pulls out of MWC 2022

14 Jan 2022
Synology DiskStation DS2422+ review: A cube of great capacity
network attached storage (NAS)

Synology DiskStation DS2422+ review: A cube of great capacity

10 Jan 2022