Chrome OS takes steps to block ‘Rubber Ducky’ USB attacks

Google is making Chromebooks less susceptible to sabotage via USB port

The Acer Chromebook 14 for Work with the lid closed

Google has said it will allow users to disable the USB ports on their Chromebooks when the screen is locked, in an attempt to counteract the problem of hackers exploiting the tech to infect a machine with malware.

USB ports may have provided the world with a very easy standard of sharing data, but they have also given hackers an equally easy opening, provided they have physical access.

These so-called "Rubber Ducky" attacks involve inserting a malicious thumb drive into a USB port, which tricks the computer into believing it is a keyboard, which then runs malicious commands. A number of variants of this nasty trick have emerged over the years, including BadUSB, PoisonTap, USBdriveby and USBHarpoon.

There's one surprisingly simple fix that eliminates the problem in one fell swoop though: if a hacker has to have physical access, then it makes sense that the computer's owner can't be around at the time. With that in mind, simply disabling the USB ports when the computer is screen locked sidesteps the issue. In other words, when the computer is unattended, it simply won't read any USB devices connected until it's unlocked again.

Advertisement
Advertisement - Article continues below
Advertisement - Article continues below

This is the approach that Apple took with an update to iOS last year, and now it looks like it's coming to Chrome OS. As spotted by Chrome Story, an update to the operating system's Canary build gives users the option to disable USB ports when the screen is locked. Users can enable it by modifying the Chrome OS flag: chrome://flags/#enable-usbguard

Helpfully, the USB ports will only be disabled for new devices so if you've started a big file copy and left your Chromebook unattended, you won't come back to find that its given up halfway through.

USB Guard is currently in the Canary build of Chrome OS, but you would imagine it'll emerge in a stable build of the operating system in the very near future.

Featured Resources

Digitally perfecting the supply chain

How new technologies are being leveraged to transform the manufacturing supply chain

Download now

Three keys to maximise application migration and modernisation success

Harness the benefits that modernised applications can offer

Download now

Your enterprise cloud solutions guide

Infrastructure designed to meet your company's IT needs for next-generation cloud applications

Download now

The 3 approaches of Breach and Attack Simulation technologies

A guide to the nuances of BAS, helping you stay one step ahead of cyber criminals

Download now
Advertisement

Recommended

Visit/security/internet-security/354417/avast-and-avg-extensions-pulled-from-chrome
internet security

Avast and AVG extensions pulled from Chrome

19 Dec 2019
Visit/security/354156/google-confirms-android-cameras-can-be-hijacked-to-spy-on-you
Security

Google confirms Android cameras can be hijacked to spy on you

20 Nov 2019

Most Popular

Visit/operating-systems/25802/17-windows-10-problems-and-how-to-fix-them
operating systems

17 Windows 10 problems - and how to fix them

13 Jan 2020
Visit/security/data-breaches/354611/misconfigured-security-command-exposes-250-million-microsoft-customer
data breaches

Misconfigured security command exposes 250 million Microsoft customer records

23 Jan 2020
Visit/microsoft-windows/32066/what-to-do-if-youre-still-running-windows-7
Microsoft Windows

What to do if you're still running Windows 7

14 Jan 2020
Visit/hardware/354584/windows-10-and-the-tools-for-agile-working
Sponsored

Windows 10 and the tools for agile working

20 Jan 2020