Zoom settles $85 million lawsuit over 'zoombombing', privacy policies

Zoom has agreed to provide specialised privacy and data handling training to its employees

Zoom has agreed to pay $85 million (£61 million) and improve its security practices to settle a lawsuit that claimed it violated users’ privacy rights when it shared personal data with Google, Facebook, and LinkedIn.

The deal will also see Zoom take additional steps to prevent so-called 'zoombombing attacks', a tactic that involves users gaining unauthorised access to Zoom rooms in order to disrupt a meeting, something that proved popular during lockdown.

Zoom agreed to provide specialised privacy and data handling training to its employees as well as implement new security measures, including providing alerts to users when participants in a meeting use third-party apps during the session, as reported by Reuters.

Members from the proposed class action lawsuit would be eligible for 15% refunds on their core subscriptions, or $25, whichever is larger, and others could receive up to $15. The preliminary settlement was filed on 31 July and still requires approval from US District judge Lucy Koh in San Jose, California.

In agreeing to settle, Zoom denied any wrongdoing.

“The privacy and security of our users are top priorities for Zoom, and we take seriously the trust our users place in us. We are proud of the advancements we have made to our platform, and look forward to continuing to innovate with privacy and security at the forefront,” a spokesperson from the company told IT Pro.

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The plaintiffs’ lawyers called the settlement reasonable given the litigation risks, despite the company having collected around $1.3 billion in Zoom Meetings subscriptions from class members. The lawyers also plan to seek out up to $21.25 million for legal fees.

In February, the FTC finalised its settlement with Zoom, where it threatened to impose strict penalties if the service failed to uphold government-mandated security requirements. The FTC had complained that Zoom misled users by claiming to offer end-to-end 256-bit encryption when in reality it maintained the encryption keys. The complaint also stated that Zoom stored unencrypted meeting data on its servers for up to 60 days before moving it to secure cloud storage.

Last August, a virtual hearing for the trial against a teenager accused of July’s mass Twitter hack was cut short after the meeting was hijacked by members of the public. The conference call was hijacked by a series of interruptions, which included 15 seconds of a pornographic clip. The practice is known as ‘Zoom bombing’ where unauthorised users repeatedly join a Zoom call and interrupt the meeting taking place, if they have access to its joining details.

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