Home Office selects iProov for identity verification tech

Home Office has found a vendor to complete its EU Exit settlement app

Man using facial recognition on phone

The Home Office has found a vendor to provide the biometric facial verification technology for its secure settlement app.

iProov, a UK based software company, has agreed on a multi-year contract with the Home Office to provide the smartphone-based digital identity verification tool, which will be used for applications for the EU Exit Settlement Scheme, designed to help non-British EU citizens settle in the UK after Brixit comes into effect. 

"We are delighted that the Home Office has chosen to use iProov's unique technology for this large and important application," said iProov's founder and CEO, Andrew Bud.

"Our position as the worldwide leader in this sector has been built with great support from the UK Government over many years. Our mission to assure trust in the online ecosystem has never been more important."

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iProov is a well-recognised provider of verification tech for border patrols having been given a contract with the US Department of Homeland Security. Its software is also used in the financial sector at Dutch bank ING.

The new digital service allows secure enrolment onto Home Office services using a smartphone app. The process involves biometric matching of a user's selfie against the image read from a user's passport chip, using iProov's Flashmark technology.

iProov will provide the technology in partnership with immigration and border management company WorldReach Software and with support from Dutch contactless document specialist ReadID.

However, there's still no support from smartphone maker Apple. As it stands, users of Apple's iOS will not be able to scan their passports meaning their applications will need to be completed on an Android device or they will have to send their documents by post, which would take significantly longer.

This is despite Apple devices having been fitted with near-field communications chips since 2014. So it's not a technical issue, but more to do with company policy.

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