What is an ASPX file?

We look at what this web file does and how it can be viewed...

Web URLs

Building a website can be a complicated business, especially as they typically run on multiple configuration files. One such file is ASPX, short for 'Active Server Pages', which are used by web servers that run Microsoft's ASP.NET server-side web framework to instruct the browser to fetch certain elements, such as text or Javascript, from specific servers.

Using a server-side server as opposed to a client-side framework (such as Javascript-based frameworks like Angular, React and Ember) means that the performance of a web page is not dependant on the processing power of the user's device, and allow pages to be programmed in languages other than Javascript.

ASPX files are entirely used for back-end configurations - unless they're using them to configure a web server, users shouldn't be seeing or interacting with the ASPX files themselves. If they are, it likely means that something has gone wrong with the server of the web page they're trying to access.

ASPX files, and the ASP.NET framework used to create and run them, are open source, and thus freely available to use. They were developed by Microsoft and the most common method of working with them is via Microsoft's Visual Code Studio software, which is also free and open source, although commercial programmes like Adobe Dreamweaver also support ASP.NET development.

The Common Language Runtime (CLR) lays the foundation for ASP.NET frameworks. This allows developers and programmers to write ASP.NET code using any supported .NET language, ensuring this is an extremely adaptable system.

How to open an ASPX file

ASPX is an uncommon file extension to open in Windows. Often, if such a file is downloaded, it may be another type of file (such as a PDF). In which case, to open it, you could simply rename the file with the correct file name extension. If you were expecting an image, then you can try to rename it with a .jpg file extension.

This problem of this misnaming could be down to a browser plug-in or the browser itself. If this problem keeps happening, it may be best to try the same website but with a different browser (preferably one with a different rendering engine). If you are using Internet Explorer, Chrome, Safari, or Firefox, try using one of the other three.

Opening APEX files with Adobe Dreamweaver 

Adobe Dreamweaver is a popular web development platform that can also be used to open the ASPX files. It lets users create and publish web pages with HTML, CSS, Javascript and more, quickly and from almost anywhere.

It has a smart, simplified coding engine, with hints and tips to help users get to grips with HTML, CSS and other web standards. However, Adobe is a paid-for service and a subscription to Dreamweaver will set you back £19.97 per month

Opening APEX files with Notepad++

Notepadd++ is a free source code editor and replacement for Notepad with support for several languages, including CGI format. It is based on the editing component Scintilla and written in C++. It offers a higher execution speed and smaller program size due to its use of Win32 API and STL.

Other types of ASPX files (and what to do with them)

If you see in a browser bar a URL with .aspx at the end, this means that the page itself is being run as part of an ASP.NET framework, and there is no need to open it yourself as the browser should do this automatically. The code inside the file is processed by the webserver running ASP.NET.

If you need to open and edit a .aspx file, then you can use Microsoft's free Visual Studio to do so. You could also open up such a file using a normal text editor.

How to convert an ASPX file to PDF

There are a number of different converters to change ASPX to PDF, but its often simpler to just use a browser, like Chrome. The ASPX file just needs to be simply dragged and dropped into the browser bar where one would enter a URL. Once the new browser window opens, press ctrl+P to print. Under destination of said printing window click on 'Change' and then save it as a PDF.

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